Ed Perzel WSOC Project on Twentieth Century Charlotte

Rosa Lee Coleman oral history interview, 1979 May 25
Rosa Lee Coleman recounts her early life in Fayetteville, North Carolina, as well as her employment as a domestic service worker. As an African American, Mrs. Coleman discusses the complicated dynamics of her relationship with her white female employer, with whom she moved from Fayetteville to Charlotte in 1933. She explains that her employer treated her in a contradictory way. Mrs. Coleman specifically recalls how her employer once cared for her during an illness and yet refused to offer her sufficient wages and food during her work hours. The inadequate compensation and the lack of empathy from her employer ultimately forced Mrs. Coleman to pursue employment in another household. She also recalls racial discrimination that she encountered from a Charlotte bus driver who adamantly enforced the segregated bus seating policies. Although Mrs. Coleman laments the difficult hardships her grandparents endured during slavery, she explains that she is grateful for the racial progress made since that time., Rosa Lee Coleman was a 69-year-old woman at the time of interview. She was born in 1909. She completed the sixth grade and was employed as a domestic worker., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Susan Hicks oral history interview, 1979 May 25
Susan Hicks was a 95-year-old woman at the time of interview, which took place in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was born in 1893 and was employed with the Charlotte Red Cross., Susan Hicks gives a brief history of the American Red Cross, particularly how it was organized and functioned in Charlotte, North Carolina during and after World War I. Topics discussed include types of social services provided by the Red Cross, organizational development of the Red Cross, and other social service organizations in the United States and in Charlotte.
Will Hollisby oral history interview, 1979 May 22
Will Hollisby was around 76 years old at the time of interview, which took place in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was born in South Carolina around 1903. He was employed as a landscaper for Charlotte Pipe and Foundry and for homeowners in Charlotte., Will Hollisby recounts his fifty-seven years living in Charlotte, North Carolina. Topics include working as a landscaper for Charlotte Pipe and Foundry and for private homeowners in Myers Park; using trains, trolleys, and buses within Charlotte and to visit Gastonia and Mount Holly; and his family.
R. Powell Majors oral history interview 1, 1979 May 23
Former Charlotte Rotary Club president R. Powell Majors recounts his experience as one of the founding patrons for the Rotary-sponsored Charlotte Boys Choir. He discusses the history of the choir, as well as the administrative, support, and operational aspects of the organization. Mr. Majors devotes much of the interview to describing the choir's 1948 Christmas trip to New York City, where they performed on NBC Radio. He discusses the choir's many performances around the Carolinas including their weekly live performance on WBTV, as well as their appearance on the nationally broadcasted Ripley's Believe It or Not television program. Mr. Majors also reflects on the central role James McMillan's management played in the choir's success during its seventeen-year history., R. Powell Majors was a 72-year-old man at the time of interview. He was born in 1906 in Poole, Kentucky. He graduated from the University of Florida and was employed with Lance, Inc. as Secretary Treasurer and Director, and as fundraiser and director of the Central Piedmont Community College Foundation after retirement from Lance. He was also active in religious and civic organizations in Charlotte, and was president of the Charlotte Rotary Club from 1946-1947., Charlotte Boys Choir records. J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections. University of North Carolina at Charlotte., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Alice M. McCall oral history interview, 1979 May 24
Alice M. McCall recounts growing up in Charlotte, North Carolina during the 1910s to the 1930s. Topics discussed include her father's tailoring business, playing pranks on streetcar drivers as a child, memories of the end of World War I, changes in uptown Charlotte, and her displeasure at having to transfer to Queens College because it only admitted women.
Marshall I. Pickens oral history interview 2, 1979 March 23
Marshall I. Pickens recounts his fifty-year tenure working for the Duke Endowment fund in Charlotte, North Carolina. He explains the endowment’s purpose and lists some of the local institutions it has supported over the years, including local colleges and universities, nonprofit hospitals, child caring institutes, and rural Methodist churches. Mr. Pickens also talks briefly about people and organizations that were significant in serving the Charlotte community. In particular, he discusses the Methodist Home, United Community Services, and the Greater Charlotte Foundation; and the role of the Belk family, Mayor Stan Brookshire, and UNC Charlotte founder Bonnie Cone., Marshall I. Pickens was a 75-year-old man at the time of interview. He was born in 1904, in Pineville, North Carolina. He graduated from Duke University and was employed with the Duke Endowment as a trustee and in other capacities., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources., Marshall I. Pickens oral history interview 1, July 16, 1969. J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections. University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
Paul G. Rodden oral history interview, 1979 May 22
Paul G. Rodden was a 70-year-old man at the time of interview. He was born in Davie County, North Carolina in 1909. He graduated from high school and was employed at Pilot Life Insurance Company as an insurance salesman., Paul G. Rodden recounts his years working as an insurance agent for the Pilot Life Insurance Company during the 1940s-1970s and his family history. He describes his interest in genealogy; the Rodden family in Davie, Rowan, and Mecklenburg Counties in North Carolina; his great-grandfather's work as a farmer, and his father's work as a sawmill operator. Mr. Rodden also recalls working at Cannon Mills in Kannapolis, North Carolina as a teenager beginning around 1923, and stories from his career selling life insurance.